NRA: If Bombing Victims Had Their Own Bombs, They Could Have Fought Back

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BOSTON (TheSkunk.org) — NRA Chief Wayne LaPierre told reporters today that if the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing had been carrying their own bombs, they would have had a chance to fight back at the attackers and prevent much of the carnage. “They only thing that stops a bad guy with a bomb is a good guy with a bomb,” he said.

LaPierre believes the Second Amendment guarantees private citizens the right to carry bombs and bomb-making materials in public places. “Although we are saddened by the loss of life,” he said, “the NRA opposes any regulation infringing on a law-abiding citizen’s right to keep and bear explosive devices.”

After the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the NRA successfully  lobbied against a bill that required the use of identification taggants – special chemicals added to explosive material that can be used by investigators after a blast to trace its origin. “First the government wants to track your gunpowder,” said LaPierre, “next thing you know, they’re adding  your nuclear fission generator to a national registry.”

A group of Senators is currently working on a bill that would reduce the potency of bomb blasts while retaining an individual’s right to explode things, but LaPierre said he would oppose any attempt to limit the number of pressure cookers a bomber can carry with him.

Minority Leader Mitch McConnell  agreed, saying he would filibuster any legislation restricting the ability of average citizens to blow things up. “Instead of prohibiting people from carrying bombs,” he said, “we should be giving tax breaks to the bomb creators.”

McConnell blamed the President for the legislative gridlock.

“We’ve been sidetracked all too often with President Obama’s misguided agenda to reduce violence,” he said, “instead of working to reduce over-regulation in the financial industry.”

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